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12. Trump #3: The Hexaflexagon, Overview (1957)

12. Trump #3: The Hexaflexagon, Overview (1957)







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"When, in later years, Kurtzman voiced his regret that 'one of the reasons [he] hated to quit Trump was because of all the marvelous things [they] were going to do and never got to do,' the Hexaflexagon is our best evidence of what he had in mind."

-Joey Anuff, Comic Art, 2005 


"'Hexaflexagons,' Martin Gardner's column in Scientific American's December 1956 issue, was by all appearances a minor sensation. It inspired the editors to assign a regular Gardner feature, Mathematical Games, which commenced the very next issue and ran for the next twenty-five years. More immediately, it inspired a Rubik's Cube-like craze for the folding paper puzzles known as 'flexagons.' This Hexagon fad may have been mostly restricted to a subculture of armchair eggheads and junior mathletes, but among their numbers was Harvey Kurtzman."
-Joey Anuff, Comic Art, 2005 


"Martin Gardner's article, although it was a mere description of what a flexagon was and how to fold one up, suddenly gave the whole subject the legitimacy which it had lacked previously, as well as making its contributions to setting the origins straight. It is still a source of wonderment, that flexagons were never part of the origami tradition, something which has a venerable history."
-Harold V. McIntosh, My Flexagon Experiences, 2000 








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